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JEWISH LENS – ALL 2016 PROJECTS

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Hands. Hannah Lempert, Mercaz High School, Cincinnati, OH, USA

First Prize: Hands. Hannah Lempert, Mercaz High School, Cincinnati, OH, USA

Hands/ Hannah Lempert. The doorknob is originally from a Cincinnati, Ohio synagogue desecrated in 1968. The hands represent the vibrant spirit of today’s Jewish citizens who are free to welcome guests into their centers of prayer. “Remembering history is important to me as a Jewish teen because if the past is forgotten, history inevitably repeats itself.”

Many Faces - One People. Hadar Margalit, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

Second Prize: Many Faces – One People. Hadar Margalit, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

Many Faces – One People/ Hadar Margalit. We sit together in the Holy City of Jerusalem amidst the many colored
hues and diversity of its people. The backdrop of Jerusalem stone symbolizes the Jewish people’s unity –
past, present and future.

Third Prize: Eternal Light. Julieta Synay, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Third Prize: Eternal Light. Julieta Synay, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Eternal Light/ Julieta Synay. Fire is a symbol of the Jewish people. Although many have tried countless times to extinguish our people’s light, the Jewish people continue to burn for eternity. The image of light appears
in many bible passages, such as the eternal light in the Temple, while today, we continue to light candles on
Hanukkah and Shabbat.

LaGoya. Jamie Meschoulam, Mercaz High School, Cincinnati, OH, USA

LaGoya. Jamie Meschoulam, Mercaz High School, Cincinnati, OH, USA

LaGoya/ Jamie Meschoulam. “I wear a Star of David. Upon my heart is the Mexican flag; my religion and country merge. When I was young, I attended a Jewish day school, in a country where there are few Jews. Every Passover, I eat matzah with avocado and salsa – I am a Mexican Jew.”

A Blade of Grass. Ofek Menachem, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

A Blade of Grass. Ofek Menachem, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

A Blade of Grass/ Ofek Menachem. Ofek features flora and fauna and the importance of both a single flower
and the many green leaves just as an individual and a community each have a role in creation.

Jewish Identity, Hadar Margalit & Arielle Livhoff, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

Jewish Identity, Hadar Margalit & Arielle Livhoff, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

Jewish Identity/ Hadar Margalit & Arielle Livhoff. The Jerusalem stone and Western Wall in the background capture the Jewish people’s anchor to its past, present and future. They surround the bright and lively colors that symbolize the plurality of the Jewish people. The mix of symbols – Star of David and hands – reflects what unites the Jewish people together.

Shabbat Blessings. Ilana Hoffer, Phoenix High School of Jewish Studies, Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Shabbat Blessings. Ilana Hoffer, Phoenix High School of Jewish Studies, Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Shabbat Blessings/ Ilana Hoffer/ “This picture represents my favorite aspect of Judaism: Shabbat. It connects me to my loved ones and allows us to bring more light into the world. I love watching my younger sister recite the Shabbat prayers as my family preserves our Shabbat traditions from past to future generations.”

Flawed Diamond. Sarah Tuttleman, Phoenix High School of Jewish Studies, Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Flawed Diamond. Sarah Tuttleman, Phoenix High School of Jewish Studies, Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Flawed Diamond/ Sarah Tuttleman. This mirror symbolizes the Jewish story. Although clearly broken and
beyond repair; from a creative perspective, it can be viewed as an artistic masterpiece. The Jewish people, through generations, have practiced tikkun olam and relied on Jewish values and imagination to turn
challenges into blessings.

Reaching Up to Hashem. Amiel Katz, Kehillah High, Houston, TX, USA

Reaching Up to Hashem. Amiel Katz, Kehillah High, Houston, TX, USA

Reaching Up to Hashem/ Amiel Katz. The element of light – learning how to creatively maneuver what is available in the moment and how to artistically “bend” the light – captures the essence of what prayer could potentially be in Judaism. The tallit is highlighted as a powerful visual symbol of Jewish prayer.

Jewish Meditation. Jacklyn Kleiman, Kehillah High, Houston, TX, USA

Jewish Meditation. Jacklyn Kleiman, Kehillah High, Houston, TX, USA

Jewish Meditation/ Jacklyn Kleiman. A tallit can feel like G-D wrapping us with a robe of light and warmth to
empower us with strength and energy to create our work in the world.

Love Conquers All. Chloe Dulac, Kulanu School of Jewish Studies, Margate City, NJ, USA

Love Conquers All. Chloe Dulac, Kulanu School of Jewish Studies, Margate City, NJ, USA

Love Conquers All/ Chloe Dulac. The power of love is often strong enough to hold people together during
tough times. Across generations, love was able to bind our many broken souls into a thriving Jewish people.

Tallitot. Madeline Kent, Kulanu School of Jewish Studies, Margate City, NJ, USA

Tallitot. Madeline Kent, Kulanu School of Jewish Studies, Margate City, NJ, USA

Tallitot/ Madeline Kent. A rack of tallitot symbolizes that special moment when a bar/bat mitzvah wears
a tallit for the first time and joins the world of adulthood and responsibility. Each tallit may look alike, but each one has a unique story.

Ripples. Erik Mattson, Kulanu School of Jewish Studies, Margate City, NJ, USA

Ripples. Erik Mattson, Kulanu School of Jewish Studies, Margate City, NJ, USA

Ripples/ Eric Mattson. The “reflected” world is calm, but can be destroyed in an instant. It takes just one stone to upset nature’s balance. Eleven million Jewish and non-Jewish lives are reflected in this pond. A single event rippled their worlds, upsetting their peaceful homes – their lives cut short by the Holocaust.

B’Yachad. Carol Lifshitz, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

B’Yachad. Carol Lifshitz, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

B’Yachad/ Carol Lifshitz. “This picture symbolizes our connection to the Jewish people since childhood,” says Carol. Just as membership to a sports club encourages togetherness and unity, so too in Judaism, especially
as a lifelong member of Sociedad Hebraica, one can reinforce continuity, growth and partnership.

Three Types of Ink. Sebastian Simsolo, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Three Types of Ink. Sebastian Simsolo, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Three Types of Ink/ Sebastian Simsolo. We write our personal stories using a mixture of three types of ink – blood, sweat and tears. Each narrative can be read differently. “I write from a perspective of success: Israel’s history is my inspiration, also written in three types of ink – the blood and sweat of its soldiers, and the tears of both loss and fulfillment.”

HaTikva. Tobias Leon, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

HaTikva. Tobias Leon, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

HaTikva/ Tobias Leon. “There is a feeling of pride when the heat of this flag that safely wraps me, is warmer than the cold that surrounds me. Auschwitz is the symbol of tragedy for my beloved people and brothers. Returning to Israel, the reverberations of Hatikva call out to me: Welcome home!”

Freedom. Elias Romano, Bitui, Mexico City, Mexico

Freedom. Elias Romano, Bitui, Mexico City, Mexico

Freedom/ Elias Romano. Above all, Elias values freedom of expression to ensure his connection to his Jewish roots. The wind symbolizes freedom and highlights his participation in the Hachelutz Lamerchav youth movement – a welcoming space to express Jewish identity in a deep and meaningful way.

Am Yisrael Chai!. Danit Frenkel, Bitui, Mexico City, Mexico

Am Yisrael Chai!. Danit Frenkel, Bitui, Mexico City, Mexico

Am Yisrael Chai!/ Danit Frenkel. Jewish identity is often shaped and influenced by Jewish collective memory. Danit, a young Mexican Jew, is photographed on top of Masada at sunrise, wrapped in the Israeli flag, a powerful symbol of Jewish existence and continuity. Am Yisrael Chai!

The Star of David. Yehuda Bayna & Yona Fenta, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

The Star of David. Yehuda Bayna & Yona Fenta, Mikve Israel, Holon, Israel

The Star of David/ Yehuda Bayna & Yona Fenta. In this creative response to Benetton’s rich and colorful advertising campaign, Yehuda and Yona cleverly juxtapose a variety of shades and colors to symbolize the diversity of the Jewish people represented in the eternal symbol – the Star of David.

Looking Ahead. Renee Blachman, Mercaz High School, Cincinnati, OH, USA

Looking Ahead. Renee Blachman, Mercaz High School, Cincinnati, OH, USA

 

Jewish Collective Memory. Ian Celnikier, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Jewish Collective Memory. Ian Celnikier, Sociedad Hebraica, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Jewish Collective Memory/ Ian Celnikier. Despite persecution throughout the history of the Jewish people, Judaism never lost its essence and convictions. “Let our fate be a warning to you.” Just as the creation of the State of Israel came to protect us, the Jewish people defend and honor it.

 

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